Sumatra FTO Gayo - Bies Village

Out of stock
85.9
  • Process Method Giling Basah
  • Cultivar Typica Types
  • Farm Gate No
  • Certifications Fair Trade, Organic
Region Indonesia & SE Asia
Processing Wet Hulled (Giling Basah)
Drying Method Sun Dried on Tarps
Arrival date Mar 16 2015
Lot size 50bags/boxes
Bag size 60.00kg
Packaging GrainPro liner
Certifications CertificationsCertifications
Cultivar Detail Ateng, Bergendal, Jember
Grade 1
Appearance 1 d/300gr, 15-18 Screen
Roast Recommendations The cup is pleasantly fruited, melon and cherry, and packs a bit more acidity than I expected. I wouldn't categorize it as "high", but it's not flat either, which is what we usually see in giling basah coffees. It's a heavy bodied cup too, and the finish goes long, bitter-sweetness like pine resin. This coffee shows surprisingly well at City+ and is great all the way into the beginnings of 2nd snaps. .
Weight 1 LB

This coffee is from Bies Baru, in the Aceh region of Sumatra ("Gayo" refers to the ethnic group in this part of Aceh, Gayonese). It's from a Fair Trade Organic cooperative in the region, KSU Burni, made up of almost 1000 farmers and spread over approximately 730 hectares. Average altitude in the region ranges from 1300 - 1600 meters, and the typical varietals are grown - Ateng Bergendal, and Jember. These varietals produce an earthy, low-toned cup. But more than the varietal, the process "Giling Basah" has more to do with what is thought of as a "typical" Sumatran profile. It starts on the small-holder farms, where they pick the coffee and pulp off the fruit skin in a hand-crank machine. Then most farmers ferment the coffee in small containers to break down the fruity mucilage layer, others simply leave the bags of cherry intact overnight and pulp in the morning. Then they dry the coffee for a few hours on tarps or concrete, sell it in the local market to coffee collectors, and then the coffees are pulped while still exceptionally wet (hence the term wet-hulled). But this is a much more streamlined process at the cooperative, since farmers and producing group are one in the same. The cup is a

We selected this lot of coffee for it's rustic fruited character, heavy body, and surpassingly "present" acidity. The dry fragrance has strong earthy sweetness, slight fruit notes in the lighter roast levels, and malty sugars. The rustic aroma comes down a notch in the wet grounds, a mix of caramel and custard ("eggy"), like the smell of flan. The cup is pleasantly fruited, melon and cherry, and packs a bit more acidity than I expected. I wouldn't categorize it as "high", but it's not flat either, which is what we usually see in giling basah coffees. It's a heavy bodied cup too, and the finish goes long, bitter-sweetness like pine resin. This coffee shows surprisingly well at City+ and is great all the way into the beginnings of 2nd snaps.