Ethiopia Gr. 3 Dry Process Yirga Cheffe

The cup is fantastically fruited. Light roasts have apricot preserves, dried strawberry, melon, mango, red licorice, and anise. A bit darker on the roast and the fruits are more berry-like with milk chocolate. It has a milky body with an impressive and exotic flavor profile, sure to provide some flavor diversity for your palate. City to Full City.
Out of stock
90.2
  • Process Method No
  • Farm Gate No
Region Africa
Grade 3
Appearance 1.2 d/300gr, 16-18 Screen
Roast Recommendations City roast to Full City and beyond. We tested the light roasts mostly, but the darker levels will produce chocolate-dipped fruit notes.
Weight 1
Dry Process Yirga Cheffe is a rather new coffee. What you have bought from us in the past is Bagersh Misty Valley dry-processed coffee from the Gedio zone, and Adado Yirga Cheffe. With the new ECX coffee exchange rules for Ethiopia coffee exports, all lots (with an exception for FTO cooperative coffees) are made anonymous when they enter the Government warehouse. That means we do not know exactly which cooperative or mill this lot is from. We know it is a Yirga Cheffe, a Grade 3 (which means little - see my notes on the grading system), and nobody needs to tell us it is a dry-process. One look at the coffee, one sniff of the fragrance when grinding, and you WILL know. While making lots anonymous has been a setback it doesn't mean these coffees can't still be very ncie. The great coffees are still there, we just know less about them. I would hazard a guess here that this is a Gedio zone lot, which is the best area to do natural (dry-process) coffee in Yirga Cheffe, and that it might be from Adado district as well. As you know, the tradition in Yirga-cheffe. is wet-processing, whereas Harar has a dry-processing tradition. Wet-processing is the method used in Central America and the like, resulting in a green seed with a cleaner cup profile, and less earthy or rustic cup flavors. Dry-processing involves drying the entire coffee cherry in the sun, and later removing the skin, fruity mucilage layer and protective parchment shell that surrounds the green seed ... all in one fell swoop. Excellent dry-processed coffees are difficult because the milling method for wet-processing allows for separation of ripe and unripe coffee cherry (and other defective seeds) using water and machines. But in dry-processing, sorting you under-ripes is done visually, either by sorting the ripe cherry, or later, sorting the "green" bean. There are some under-ripes in this coffee, resulting in quakers in the final roast. But the cup is so sweet, with this big fruity character, I felt in the last analysis it is greater than it's imperfections. They can easily be removed after roasting.
The dry fragrance is heavily fruited, with intense dried fruit notes, strawberry, mango, and apricot jam scents. The wet aroma is sweet like syrup, very fruity, like sticky apricot-berry fruit roll-ups, and saturated with rustic raw honey. It has peach-mango in the lighter roasts, and more berry-like fruit at Full City roast. The cup is fantastically fruited. Light roasts have apricot preserves, dried strawberry, melon, mango, red licorice, and anise. A bit darker on the roast and the fruits are more berry-like with milk chocolate, and many of the lighter roast flavors are still present to some extent. It has a milky body, not heavy, but certainly not thin. I don't know if I want every cup of coffee I drink to taste like this, but it certainly is an impressive and exotic flavor profile, sure to provide some flavor diversity for your palate.