5 big ones

Again, many coffees are arriving at once, and I am trying to get packed for my flight to the Roaster’s Guild Retreat tomorrow at 6:30 am. Oh well. Here they are, each one a gem in their own right. Please read the full reviews and check out the Coffee Flavor Analysis charts for each of these!

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6 Responses to “5 big ones”


  1. 1 Thompson

    why no comments?

  2. 2 Jesse

    What else is in the pipeline? Is the la minita batch you are waiting for a later harvest or are they beans that are being stored at the farm for later shipment?

    Also, I called a Tyler, Texas importer because I was going to buy some La Minita from them and they referred me to you instead, so you are a legend not just on the internet.

  3. 3 reanimator

    I’m excited! Does that count? Waiting for my Guat, Braz, and Peaberry shipment!

  4. 4 Thompson

    honestly, i can’t even start to describe all the things in the pipeline — you would have to be more specific. i think it’s a pretty good year for la minita, better than last, and that is better than the one 2 years ago, which was a low point. the issue is this; all of la minita’s competitors, those who used to treat coffee much more as a bulk commodity, have gotten a lot better. even the big co-op mills run their own micro-mills. but what i am really talking about are small farm micro-mill costa rica, something that hardly existed 5 years ago. i am rambling … to answer your question we will have CRLM in 2-3 weeks and it will be their mid-harvest lot, i believe the next one in sequence, and the last we will receive of the season. look for a mini lot of costa rica gesha (!) soon. -tom

  5. 5 Jesse

    Interesting note about Costa Ricans — I got some Las Lajas — both the miel and the WP versions that you were not a big fan of in your cupping notes. While it is not nearly as good as CRLM, I enjoy it more than you did and it kind of got me thinking. Do you feel like you may have to start changing your scoring system to reflect increased quality across the board? If a coffee that you consider an average coffee comes along that in your mind is “better” than an “excellent” coffee from 04, how will you try to reflect that? Are there coffees you score now at 84 that would have been 87-89 5 years ago? Do you worry that increased quality is going to lead to sameness amongs farms, or does God take care of that through the human factor, climate, elevation and soil?

    I am a Panamanian, Guat, and Kenya guy — anything new of note coming from there? I will be ordering some more Carmen Estate before it disappears. Anyway, thanks for your time and space to ramble.

  6. 6 Thompson

    i think the simplest answer is “taste memory.” it requires no special skill except continuous cupping of diverse samples over multiple crop years, and you just kinda develop an index for quality. look at oaxaca scores: higher across the board than in any previous year. harar and dp sidamo scores, lower for sure this year. but there are always exceptions too, and as a cupper i am always trying to beat the odds. that might make it look like scores are more consistent from year to year, simply because i happened to find one of the few 87 coffees when many quality farms were at 84. anyway, no easy answer to this, but it does take the perspective of a few highs and lows in cup quality to understand the true range of any origin. -tom

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