New Microlot arrivals and a Yirga Cheffe!

New Microlots are in, from Colombia and Costa Rica !  and a Yirg!… Check the full reviews but here are the briefs on these limited offerings: Colombia Finca Buenavista -Carlos Imbachi Microlot: sweetly fruited, floral aroma. Colombia La Esperanza -Isaias Cantillo Osa Microlot: darker fruit tastes, syrupy body.
Colombia Los Galpones -Manuel Santacruz Microlot: delicate, grape-like. Subtle and nuanced at a light roast. And it’s the return of Costa Rica Organic La Yunta Estate: hints of peaches in syrup, it’s a subtle “drinking” coffee.”  Lastly, we also have a balanced wet-process African addition, the Ethiopia Mullege Yirga Cheffe: passionfruit, guava, creamy feel. Keep the roast light!

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5 Responses to “New Microlot arrivals and a Yirga Cheffe!”


  1. 1 thejavaman

    I just ordered a pound of each of these new microlot Colombians and I can’t wait to try them. I’m sort of surprised that two of them (La Esperanza & Los Galpones) have a small amount of Variedad Colombia in them. I thought that was one of the “dreaded” cultivars that supposedly have a negative influence on cup character. What’s your take on this varietal in general?

  2. 2 Terry

    Does anyone have any pointers on developing a “coffee palate?” I’ve done my best to try to detect flavors as described in these microlots, with not much success.

    I can detect chocolate easily (who can’t?) and creamy tastes, and can tell when there’s a finish I like, but I’d love to experience the tastes of peaches in syrup, passionfruit and guava talked about in this post.

  3. 3 bbypy

    bbypy wrote:

    Does anyone have any pointers on developing a “coffee palate?” I’ve done my best to try to detect flavors as described in these microlots, with not much success.

    I can detect chocolate easily (who can’t?) and creamy tastes, and can tell when there’s a finish I like, but I’d love to experience the tastes of peaches in syrup, passionfruit and guava talked about in this post.

    @Terry,

    When I first got turned onto SM, I tried to do the same as you without much success. Some of it is surely my own process variation. But coffee, like wine, is so complex that unless you follow the cupping procedure to the fullest extent, I suspect you are not likely to be able to recover it all. I was letting the descriptions set my expectations for what I was experiencing and getting a bit upset at not being able to reproduce them. I just concluded that smell and taste are very complex and everyone is wired up differently. So, there is no point trying. Occasionally, I share a batch of my home roast with a hockey buddy who developed the Clover and now works at SBUX. We always have a good laugh at the hugely different experiences we describe from the same batch. In fact, some of this stuff has even made it to the table of senior tasters at SBUX. On the Idido Vy, one odd bit of feedback was “dirty but not rough.” Now, that’s just a great. Decide for yourself how to interpret or what this guy’s been into. It may not be much use in a cupping competition but I thought it was a great. I started thinking of coffees this way for myself. Giankanja, for example, is the Batman. It’s got a dark menacing character but is at the same time refined and complex.

    Now a technical question. What is are good criteria for marking 1st crack start and stop? Start is easier. I mark the time by the 2nd pop that I hear. I find stop is a lot trickier because the pops tend to trail off instead of ending abruptly. Am I just not listening carefully enough?

  4. 4 thejavaman

    thejavaman wrote:

    I just ordered a pound of each of these new microlot Colombians and I can’t wait to try them. I’m sort of surprised that two of them (La Esperanza & Los Galpones) have a small amount of Variedad Colombia in them. I thought that was one of the “dreaded” cultivars that supposedly have a negative influence on cup character. What’s your take on this varietal in general?

    No thoughts on the Variedad Colombia varietal???

  5. 5 Thompson

    No thoughts on the Variedad Colombia varietal???

    Pure Variedad Colombia or it’s new brother Castillo variety are problematic. They can have good years, especially when the plants are young, then the plants tend to overstress themselves and quality issues in the cup can show. Small percentages of these types in a coffee are difficult to detect in the cup. Over time, a good farm will take these out and replant with Typica or Caturra, but in the meantime a certain limited percentage is not a big deal from a cup quality point of view – IMHO -Tom

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