GeshaFest 2008

It’s time for GeshaFest 2008. The fabled Panama Esmeralda Estate Gesha (AKA Geisha) auction lots are here, with prices ranging from $10.50 to a trifling $125 per Lb.! Ouch. Is the top lot that good? Yep, highest rating we have ever given a Gesha coffee. It’s not for everyone, but we hope offering these 4 distinct lots, at 4 price ranges, everyone can check out the way this special cultivar influences aroma and cup flavors of this unique offering. Rounding out our Gesha offerings for 2008 is the arrival of our Guatemala Acatenango Buena Vista Gesha. We have a very small amount, and the coffee scores slightly lower this year, both the result of wind damage to the trees in storms of late ’07. Below, a picture of the Esmeralda Lot 3, Peaberry. It was the smallest lot in the auction, and a modest $66 bucks a pound! We have just 150 Lbs of this lot (as with the $125 per pound Lot 2 – the highest price in the auction!) These 2 lots will come vacuum packed in 1/2 lb bags, and will include a Lb. of the lowest priced Lot 5 for test roasting, and for cupping comparison.Panama Esmeralda Gesha Peaberry Lot 3

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5 Responses to “GeshaFest 2008”


  1. 1 Thompson

    Okay – people don’t seem to comment on the weblog much these days. I know it is bad form to comment on your own posts, but I was sitting out in the yard tonight, thinking about GeshaFest 2008 (a name that is more that a little tongue in cheek). Today we (momentarily) thought we came up 3 lbs. short when we were vac packing the high price Gesha and I realized with that small discrepancy we would have actually negated our entire profit! How precarious it is to buy coffee at these prices and sell it at a slim margin. But we seem to do these things quite often. MicroLots and auction coffees are going to be the death of me, seriously. I have never spent so much time on coffee reviews, and up in the cupping room. I have been neglecting our web pages. There is so much to do. We are having cupppings here, but still don’t have a decent page illustrating the cupping process. I have video I shot 2 years ago of every step of a COE cupping, spanning 3 countries, and I still haven’t edited it. I want to produce a new roasted coffee card from new images shot with a better macro lens, but I just can’t find the time to pull it together. And here we have $125/lb coffee that requires a week of attention to get it listed properly, and full day of group effort to vacuum package it properly. And for that, 3 Lbs short will wipe out our profit. I could wear this as a badge of honor, that we do things that don’t make “business sense”. But frankly it causes a lot of stress. Luckily, I will wager we will sell out of #2 and #3 in a week to 10 days and it will be done. Good, I say. If we get through this without losing money I will have reason to be proud, or at least relieved. I am not sure sometimes what all these crazy, obsessed home roasters think of us. But I wonder if we all went to group therapy together, I might top everyone for the most obsessed and irrational of the bunch. And I am supposed the be a business man, huh! Esmeralda auction came down to a $60,000+ wire transfer for us. All poor Maria could do was shake her head… -Tom

  2. 2 Golasso

    And to think I completely freaked out when I spilled a cup of the “cheap” Esmeralda green on the floor the other night. So worried the dogs were going to run over and eat them.

    Question for you – just got done reading God in a Cup. The author mentioned that lots of people were starting to plant Gesha. Is this just wishful thinking on the part of the farmers? Are they misguided into thinking that Gesha is going to magically mean they make $5, $20, $100 per pound? Or are most of them smart enough realize that supply/demand means that the more quality Gesha is out there the less Gesha is going to go for? Also, what do you think Gesha planted all round Central America would do to bourbon and typica prices and supply. Is anyone considering ripping those trees out and planting Gesha?… I guess that was more than one question. Thanks.

  3. 3 thejavaman

    I was quite surprise at the pricing on your Gesha lots. I looked at several other companies who participated in the Esmeralda Special auction and their pricing is WAAAAY above yours! $95.00 for a 1/2 pound of coffee?!?! Come on!!! I know Auction Lot #2 is really phenomenal coffee, but that is a lot of money to spend for a cup ‘o joe. I really like that you guys offer the absolute best coffee there is on the planet and you sell it for a reasonable price as well. It may not make “business sense”, but at least you have customers (like me) who try to support you in everything you do. The bottom line is that people (especially seasoned homeroasters) will pay for quality and we all know that you can’t get a “bad” coffee from SM’s….

  4. 4 Thompson

    Thanks a lot. I have ambivalent feelings about these really high price coffees. But I think everyone knows that a. they ARE special, not just hype and b. there are coffees that rival these, at a fraction of the price. Well, to qualify that, if you take a really good roast of wet-process Koratie and you cull out a few off beans, you are going to have a world class cup. Offering super high price coffees will not be our focus, it’s really just about the cup quality. For me, finding regular lots that COULD be auction winners, that in a competition would be priced exponentially higher, but are offered at much more reasonable prices (that still mean the farmers are paid really well) .. that’s what I we focus on… thanks again,

    Tom

    Thompson wrote:

    I was quite surprise at the pricing on your Gesha lots. I looked at several other companies who participated in the Esmeralda Special auction and their pricing is WAAAAY above yours! $95.00 for a 1/2 pound of coffee?!?! Come on!!! I know Auction Lot #2 is really phenomenal coffee, but that is a lot of money to spend for a cup ‘o joe. I really like that you guys offer the absolute best coffee there is on the planet and you sell it for a reasonable price as well. It may not make “business sense”, but at least you have customers (like me) who try to support you in everything you do. The bottom line is that people (especially seasoned homeroasters) will pay for quality and we all know that you can’t get a “bad” coffee from SM’s….

  5. 5 jordan g

    Thompson wrote:

    Okay – people don’t seem to comment on the weblog much these days. I know it is bad form to comment on your own posts, but I was sitting out in the yard tonight, thinking about GeshaFest 2008 (a name that is more that a little tongue in cheek).

    I say nay nay, O’ wise and eminent sage of all things coffee.

    Well, I haven’t been commenting per se….but I’m certainly reading, as I’m sure many others are. I’m just such a noob that I don’t have anything worthy to contribute.

    Anywho – your business philosophies, care for the craft and approachability should be lauded – perhaps it’s not always measurable in financial gains….but it’s greatly appreciated amongst your sponge-like customer base. Seriously, I can’t tell you how much I’ve learned from your site – and it all comes across as genuine and altruistic (as a business owner can possibly be).

    Man, I’m really sucking up in my first post, eh? I’m just trying to butter ya up to keep the flat rate shipping promo going:)

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