Daily Archive for June 9th, 2010

New arrivals: Kenya Murang’a Kangunu, Kenya Kirinyaga Karani PB, Brazil Cerrado DP Fazenda Aurea, Sumatra Lintong Blue Batak

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We’re excited to announce… four new coffees and two are Kenyas! First is the stellar Kenya Murang’a AA Kangunu … a tongue-twister in name and taste, this is a bright coffee with sweet honey and floral notes. It has malty syrup, honey and caramel and distinct berry notes toward the darker roasts. See the full review for more info on the coop and the farm-gate type of sale. Next we have Kenya Kirinyaga Karani Peaberry, an effervescent cup with complex Nyeri-like brightness and malt syrup notes. Darker roasts have a bittersweet and dark chocolate accent. These lots are limited so act fast! Bringing up the rear are two favorites fully back in stock. The Brazil Cerrado DP Fazenda Aurea is a great blend base, single-origin espresso, or drinking coffee as most of you know by now. Look for great creamy body and a clean flavor profile with nuts and chocolate at darker roasts. Finally, we have Sumatra Lintong Blue Batak, a thick-bodied, spicy and rustic cup with fruit notes and a sweetness that sets it a bit apart. Takes a dark roast well too!

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Roast Coffee Pairing #38: Indonesian Comparison

We roasted two different Indonesian coffees this time… a Sumatra Grade 1, a Classic Mandheling,… and  Sumatra Onan Ganjang Cultivar.  The Grade 1 Mandheling is what many people look for in Sumatran coffee – heavy body  and a complex earthy flavor. This is a deep, brooding, pungent, bass note coffee, with an undertone of mildly earthy dark chocolate.  Onan Ganjang is a local cultivar from the Lintong area with the thick, creamy mouthfeel and low acidity you might expect in Sumatran coffee, but more rustic sweetness,  malty caramel, butterscotch, chocolate, and slightly herbal flavors.   Look for the taste differences between these two coffees at a similar roast level and it should be apparent how different Indonesian coffees, in this case two Sumatrans, can be.  Each batch was roasted to Full City, 15 minutes, 435 degrees.

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